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Important Factors for Your Mining Resume

2018, Mining

What the Recruiter Looks for in a Mining Resume

Preparing a resume can be a daunting task. However, preparing a mining resume requires careful thought as to what information to put, what to leave and what to emphasise.

Some mining clients who come to us are worried that their resume is too long. This is generally due to no fault of theirs but to the vagaries of the mining industry, with its short-term contracts, extended shut-down and so on. So, 12, six or even three-month contracts are not unusual and will make for a lengthy mining resume. This is fine. Also, a consistent and stable work history that demonstrates you are reliable, committed and will turn up every day is very important. If you have had time out of work, state this briefly in your career summary – stating that you took time out to travel is far more acceptable than saying nothing at all.

mining resume

It’s All in The Details

Your mining resume must contain detailed experience – the actual responsibilities you have had in your previous employment, not vague duties. And this includes the machinery you have worked on. If you are a mobile plant operator, it is no good to just list yourself as, for example, a dump truck driver. Was a CAT? A Komatsu? Which model number? These are the crucial details that the recruiter is very keen to know.

Similarly, they will want to see a list of licences, qualifications and machinery operating tickets that are relevant to the role you are applying for, including the date the qualification was obtained and/or the date the qualification expires. If you are in the middle of a Cert III or IV course when your mining resume is being prepared – put it on as ‘ongoing’ – recruiters like to see evidence of ongoing professional development, especially if you are committed enough to study whilst working – a big plus.

Important Factors for Your Mining Resume

Industry Specific Keywords and Acronyms

Scanning technology is being used more and more to filter the sometimes hundreds of mining resumes that recruiters receive for a single job. ATS is a software application designed to help an enterprise recruit employees more efficiently. Within the mining industry, when you are listing your qualifications, key skills and technical proficiencies, stick to standardised descriptive methods and acknowledged ways of stating things like the machinery you work on, accepted descriptive nouns for your particular duties and so on. If you stray from the norm, ATS is likely to miss them, and you could get rejected on a technicality.

Industry-specific mining terminology and acronyms such as:

  • FIFO (Fly-In, Fly-Out)
  • DIDO (Drive-In, Drive-out)
  • PPE (Personal Protective Equipment)
  • JSA (Job Safety Analysis)
  • RII (Resources & Infrastructure Industry)
  • Dump Truck (and other specific mobile and fixed plant)
  • Standard 11, Mining Induction

If your resume does not include at least some of these terms, it could dramatically decrease your chances of being selected for an interview.

Mining Resume

This Is Why You Need A Good Mining Resume

At Select Resumes, we have extensive experience writing and updating mining resumes across all levels of experience. We know the details that need to be seen in order to sell you effectively to HR staff in these sectors. Essentially, we need to place your industry-specific and demonstrated professional skills front and centre. When you engage Select Resumes, if you are targeting a specific position we will research the company and showcase those skills that align with the employers’ needs. This will create an instant desire to know more plus demonstrate to them that you have done some homework and have responded to their needs in a proactive way.

With several years of experience in creating mining resumes that work, Select Resumes are here 24/7, 365 days a year to help you get your resume up to scratch for the next phase of your career. Call us today for an informal chat.

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